Tag Archives: antibiotic prescribing

Top 10 most read BJGP research articles published in 2016

16Jan_Top10_research_2015_BJGP_smThese are the top 10 most read research articles based on full text downloads from bjgp.org in 2016.

1. Overdiagnosis of asthma in children in primary care: a retrospective analysis. 
http://bjgp.org/content/66/644/e152

Overdiagnosis of childhood asthma is common in primary care, leading to unnecessary treatment, disease burden, and impact on quality of life. However, only in a small percentage of children is a diagnosis of asthma confirmed by lung function tests.

2. Telephone triage systems in UK general practice: analysis of consultation duration during the index day in a pragmatic randomised controlled trial. 
http://bjgp.org/content/66/644/e214

Telephone triage is not associated with a reduction in overall clinician contact time during the index day. Nurse-led triage is associated with a reduction in GP contact time but with an overall increase in clinician contact time. Individual practices may wish to interpret the findings in the context of the available skill mix of clinicians.

3. Primary care clinician antibiotic prescribing decisions in consultations for children with RTIs: a qualitative interview study.
http://bjgp.org/content/66/644/e207

Prognostic uncertainty remains an important driver of health care professionals’ antibiotic prescribing. Experience and training in recognising severe respiratory tract infections (RTIs), together with more evidence to help professionals identify the children at risk of future illness deterioration, may support identification of the children most and least likely to benefit from antibiotics.

4. Continuity of care in primary care and association with survival in older people: a 17-year prospective cohort study.
http://bjgp.org/content/66/649/e531

This study demonstrates that low continuity of care in general practice is associated with a higher risk of mortality, strengthening the case for encouragement of continuity of care.

5. Nursery sickness policies and their influence on prescribing for conjunctivitis: audit and questionnaire survey.
http://bjgp.org/content/66/650/e674

Most of the childcare providers’ sickness policies contain requirements that are inconsistent with Public Health England guidance. The requirements of childcare sickness policies are likely to be resulting in unnecessary primary care consultations and thousands of prescriptions for antibiotics with little demonstrable clinical or public health benefit.

6. Unrecognised bipolar disorder among UK primary care patients prescribed antidepressants: an observational study.
http://bjgp.org/content/66/643/e71

Among people aged 16–40 years prescribed antidepressants in primary care for depression or anxiety, there is a substantial proportion with unrecognised bipolar disorder. When seeing patients with depression or anxiety disorder, particularly when they are young or not doing well, clinicians should review the life history for evidence of unrecognised bipolar disorder. Some clinicians might find the Mood Disorder Questionnaire to be a useful supplement to non-standardised questioning.

7. Identifying depression among adolescents using three key questions: a validation study in primary care.
http://bjgp.org/content/66/643/e65

Depression in teenagers can have serious consequences and the incidence seems to be increasing. Three short questions, suitable for use in general practice, are useful for identifying depression in adolescents in primary health care.

8. Barriers to effective management of type 2 diabetes in primary care: qualitative systematic review.
http://bjgp.org/content/66/643/e114

Although resources are important, many barriers to improving care are amenable to behaviour change strategies. Improvement strategies need to account for differences between clinical targets and consider tailored rather than ‘one size fits all’ approaches. Training targeting knowledge is necessary but insufficient to bring about major change; approaches to improve diabetes care need to delineate roles and responsibilities, and address clinicians’ skills and emotions around treatment intensification and facilitation of patient behaviour change.

9. Comparison of brief interventions in primary care on smoking and excessive alcohol consumption: a population survey in England.
http://bjgp.org/content/66/642/e1

Whereas approximately half of smokers in England visiting their GP in the past year report having received advice on cessation, less than 10% of those who drink excessively report having received advice on their alcohol consumption.

10. Molluscum contagiosum and associations with atopic eczema in children: a retrospective longitudinal study in primary care.
http://bjgp.org/content/66/642/e53

Consultations for molluscum contagiosum in primary care are common, especially in 1–9-year-olds, but they declined significantly during the decade under study. A primary care diagnosis of atopic eczema is associated with an increased risk of a subsequent primary care diagnosis of molluscum contagiosum.

 

Being patient-centred – who are we trying to please?

bjgpApr-2015-65-633-204.jpgPeter Aird is a GP in Bridgwater, Somerset.

This week I’ve received some good news. I’ve been ‘liked’ by the GMC. Well I say liked, I mean of course ‘revalidated’ but it comes to the same thing. I posted a few comments of questionable value on an appraisal website and, lo and behold, I’ve been affirmed by no less an organisation than the GMC.

Yet the experience left me feeling somewhat flat. Curiously, being approved of by a faceless organisation, which demands certain requirements that I must satisfy in order to have their approval bestowed upon me, turns out not to be as fulfilling as I’d hoped. Tragically though, it seems that we are being driven by an ever greater need to be liked. It’s not just Facebook. It is a requirement that we be approved of by various groups – groups that sometimes have diametrically opposed ideas of what it is they want from us.

Take the antibiotic prescribing issue. On one hand we are quite correctly being encouraged to reduce our antibiotic prescribing and being threatened with a reprimand if we do not curtail their inappropriate use. But, on the other hand, we are being judged by how satisfied our patients are by our practice and, despite what patient education programmes try to convey, the idea continues to be held, even by some of the most educated of our patients, that antibiotics are required for minor self-limiting infections. Without them many of our patients won’t be satisfied. One wonders if scientific explanation of the facts will ever be effective in a society that increasingly has dismissed scientific fact in favour of what it feels is right.  Aren’t we all a little like Stewart Lee’s taxi driver who dismisses what he doesn’t want to believe with, ‘Well you can prove anything with facts!’? Leaving aside that particular question though, one thing is certain – it is impossible to satisfy the competing desire of patients who want antibiotics and those who want us to reduce antibiotic prescribing.

Similarly we are being asked to avoid unnecessary admissions to hospital whilst being increasingly criticised for delays in diagnosis and referral. Some have called for a doubling of our referrals to cancer services and starting primary prevention for heart disease at ever lower levels of risk, and yet our referral rates and prescribing practices are under ever more scrutiny.

Who are we going to choose to please?

I wonder if we doctors are particularly vulnerable to the need to being liked. How many of us were the good boys and girls at school who, driven by the desire to please, worked hard for our teachers, didn’t like to disappoint the careers advisor who suggested we tried our hand at medicine, and jumped at the chance of entering a profession which made our parents proud? Not that there’s anything wrong with any of this – it’s just that we may not be the best people to say an appropriate ‘No’ to our patients and risk disappointing them. After all didn’t we go into medicine, first and foremost to help patients – to please them, and not our bureaucratic taskmasters, who we find it equally hard to say no to?

The truth is that one can’t please everybody all the time – and we are fools to try. In a society that constantly and increasingly seeks affirmation it is no wonder that we are overwhelmed by the need to please those with competing desires. Whatever we do is wrong in somebody’s eyes. The incessant double binds threaten, not only our own happiness but also the stability of the whole system. A system already creaking from the overwhelming demand and time limitations that together drive us, perhaps, along the route of least resistance – the route that earns us a ‘like’ most easily – the one that comes from our patients. We may not be proud of it, but haven’t we all issued an antibiotic or renewed a sick note, not entirely appropriately, as we simply did not have the time or energy to do otherwise and out of a desire to please the patient?

Something is going to have to change in regards to the way we behave if things are to improve. We need to be professionals who are in the job, not to be admired, but to do what is necessary. Whisper it quietly, but we are going to have to be less patient-centred in order to be more patient appropriate. We are going to have to be less concerned about doing what our patients want, what they will like us for, and try instead to do, to the best of our ability, what is right. And we are going to have to care less about how we are thought of by our patients – I’m not sure just how valid their opinion always is anyway. On a single day last month I received two pieces of feedback – one accused me of incompetence, the other rated me as unusually astute. So which is it? Well of course it is neither – I am no more awesome than I am useless. I am in fact ordinary – an ordinary GP who, like ordinary GPs up and down the country, knows less cardiology than a cardiologist – but more than my patients. Our patients, our politicians, and we ourselves are going to have to accept this – whether they, or we, ‘like’ it or not.