Tag Archives: type 2 diabetes

Top 10 most read BJGP research articles published in 2016

16Jan_Top10_research_2015_BJGP_smThese are the top 10 most read research articles based on full text downloads from bjgp.org in 2016.

1. Overdiagnosis of asthma in children in primary care: a retrospective analysis. 
http://bjgp.org/content/66/644/e152

Overdiagnosis of childhood asthma is common in primary care, leading to unnecessary treatment, disease burden, and impact on quality of life. However, only in a small percentage of children is a diagnosis of asthma confirmed by lung function tests.

2. Telephone triage systems in UK general practice: analysis of consultation duration during the index day in a pragmatic randomised controlled trial. 
http://bjgp.org/content/66/644/e214

Telephone triage is not associated with a reduction in overall clinician contact time during the index day. Nurse-led triage is associated with a reduction in GP contact time but with an overall increase in clinician contact time. Individual practices may wish to interpret the findings in the context of the available skill mix of clinicians.

3. Primary care clinician antibiotic prescribing decisions in consultations for children with RTIs: a qualitative interview study.
http://bjgp.org/content/66/644/e207

Prognostic uncertainty remains an important driver of health care professionals’ antibiotic prescribing. Experience and training in recognising severe respiratory tract infections (RTIs), together with more evidence to help professionals identify the children at risk of future illness deterioration, may support identification of the children most and least likely to benefit from antibiotics.

4. Continuity of care in primary care and association with survival in older people: a 17-year prospective cohort study.
http://bjgp.org/content/66/649/e531

This study demonstrates that low continuity of care in general practice is associated with a higher risk of mortality, strengthening the case for encouragement of continuity of care.

5. Nursery sickness policies and their influence on prescribing for conjunctivitis: audit and questionnaire survey.
http://bjgp.org/content/66/650/e674

Most of the childcare providers’ sickness policies contain requirements that are inconsistent with Public Health England guidance. The requirements of childcare sickness policies are likely to be resulting in unnecessary primary care consultations and thousands of prescriptions for antibiotics with little demonstrable clinical or public health benefit.

6. Unrecognised bipolar disorder among UK primary care patients prescribed antidepressants: an observational study.
http://bjgp.org/content/66/643/e71

Among people aged 16–40 years prescribed antidepressants in primary care for depression or anxiety, there is a substantial proportion with unrecognised bipolar disorder. When seeing patients with depression or anxiety disorder, particularly when they are young or not doing well, clinicians should review the life history for evidence of unrecognised bipolar disorder. Some clinicians might find the Mood Disorder Questionnaire to be a useful supplement to non-standardised questioning.

7. Identifying depression among adolescents using three key questions: a validation study in primary care.
http://bjgp.org/content/66/643/e65

Depression in teenagers can have serious consequences and the incidence seems to be increasing. Three short questions, suitable for use in general practice, are useful for identifying depression in adolescents in primary health care.

8. Barriers to effective management of type 2 diabetes in primary care: qualitative systematic review.
http://bjgp.org/content/66/643/e114

Although resources are important, many barriers to improving care are amenable to behaviour change strategies. Improvement strategies need to account for differences between clinical targets and consider tailored rather than ‘one size fits all’ approaches. Training targeting knowledge is necessary but insufficient to bring about major change; approaches to improve diabetes care need to delineate roles and responsibilities, and address clinicians’ skills and emotions around treatment intensification and facilitation of patient behaviour change.

9. Comparison of brief interventions in primary care on smoking and excessive alcohol consumption: a population survey in England.
http://bjgp.org/content/66/642/e1

Whereas approximately half of smokers in England visiting their GP in the past year report having received advice on cessation, less than 10% of those who drink excessively report having received advice on their alcohol consumption.

10. Molluscum contagiosum and associations with atopic eczema in children: a retrospective longitudinal study in primary care.
http://bjgp.org/content/66/642/e53

Consultations for molluscum contagiosum in primary care are common, especially in 1–9-year-olds, but they declined significantly during the decade under study. A primary care diagnosis of atopic eczema is associated with an increased risk of a subsequent primary care diagnosis of molluscum contagiosum.